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BLOG SITE OF SPIRITUALMAN, KEVILL DAVIES

Novelist. Author of APSARAS and tales from the beautiful Saigh Valley. First person to quantify spiritual values.

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Tuesday, 27 September 2016

Happiness Index, Gravity and clocks

HAPPINESS INDEX. GRAVITY & CLOCKS


We have all heard the phrase, ‘Doesn’t time fly when you’re enjoying yourself’, but what do we mean by it? Can we describe the sensation of ‘time flying’ in more scientific terms? Conventional scientists might say, ‘no’ but, perhaps, the Davies Hypothesis can, at least, show a way forward.

Remember that we have defined perceived time, T, in terms of the ‘real’ or measured time, the ‘unreal’ time and the ‘imaginary’ time according to the ‘trinitarian’ equation below:

T= ±√[t² + (-t)² + (it)²]

From this we have resolved that:
                       
                                    T = ± t

In other words, in our part of the universe and ignoring the negative answer, we feel time passing at the rate of ‘real’ time, or one second per second. No surprises there. Looking at the Trinitarian equation we notice that the coefficients of each term is unity but must ask the question if this is always the case. It is entirely plausible to assume that the ‘real’ terms always remain the same but what of the third term, the ‘imaginary’ time component. Remember this is the term responsible for dreams; for man’s imagination and spirituality. Below I have drawn a table showing the perceived time for different coefficients of ‘imaginary’ time.


Coefficient
           Perceived Time, T


  

0.05
1.395t

0.1
1.38t

0.2
1.34t

0.3
1.3t

0.4
1.25t

0.9
1.05t

1
1t

1.2
0.9t

1.5
0.7t

1.8
0.45t

2
0







-100
10t

-1000000
1000t





We can see that for coefficient values from 0 to 1, the perceived time is longer than ‘real’ time and therefore time palls. We are not enjoying ourselves. However for coefficient values between 1 and 2, perceived time is indeed shorter than ‘real’ time and we’re having fun. So, we can indeed build an happiness index based on the ‘trinitarian equation’ as applied to time; close to zero, no fun, close to two, ecstatic. (At the figure of 2, indeed, it seems that time stands still.)
What else can we glean from these figures?

We cannot realistically have a coefficient greater than 2 because that leads us into ‘fairyland’, the domain of imaginary numbers. However, we can go below zero into the realm of negative numbers and we show two examples that demonstrate that perceived time stretches out to a large extent when the negative coefficient rises. If we take the example of minus one million, we can see that the perceived time is a thousand times longer.
T= ±√[t² + (-t)² -1000000 (it)²]

T ~ 1000t   (ignoring the other terms as too small)

At this level of misery an half an hour in the dentists chair will seem like ten days.


There is however a more serious side to this; the question of time dilation. Where does science predict the most dramatic slowing down of time? I suggest it is at the event horizon of a black hole where time almost stands still. Could it be that the enormous gravity exerted by the black hole changes the coefficient of the ‘imaginary’ time component; that gravity and time are linked? In these extreme circumstances, the coefficient of the ‘imaginary’ term could run into the minus trillions. Einstein predicted that increased gravity slowed down clocks, now the ‘Davies Hypothesis’ demonstrates how.

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