Novelist. Author of APSARAS and other stories

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Monday, 23 November 2015

Kevill Davies Spiritual Man 2

Apostates need help

It is reported that the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, has again questioned his own belief in a God following the Paris atrocities. He has previously voiced his doubts and comes at a time when Pope Francis has warned Christians that they may have to change the way they conceive God. see here:

If, as I think, they are preparing their Churches for a seismic shift on the 1700 year anniversary of the Council of Nicaea in 2025, then these utterings must be paving the way. However, to confront much of what is wrong with the world today one needs to take into account the Muslim problem and their deeply entrenched medieval traditions. It is credible that in the twenty-first century many Muslims also see their religion as outdated but are afraid to speak out because of the often fatal consequences of apostasy. I believe that Western Governments ought to help these people by outlawing all punishments for apostasy and giving more support to people under threat from their own communities.

Friday, 20 November 2015

Terrorism equates with tribalism

Having started to read TE Lawrence's book, 'Seven Pillars of Wisdom', I am immediately taken by the extreme tribalism of the Middle East and the Arabian peninsular in particular. Whereas in the West, tribalism used to exist as no more than amicable banter about Yorkshiremen and men from Kerry, that of the Arab fraternity still retains much of the blood feud mentality. I say used to exist in the West because I have noticed that recently, following the influx of Muslim immigrants, tensions have risen and 'politically correct' prohibition of sectarian 'jokes' has fuelled a widening divide.
It is not hard to see why tribalism is rife in the Middle East. Resources are scarce and defended vigorously. Water is vital and tribes protect their wells and oasis as if their lives depended on it; which they did. It is part of the Arab character, as a matter of honour, therefore, to be defensive to the point of death.
Religion, too, has become tribalised. The Shia Iranians side with the Alawyte Syrians of Assad. They are loathed as infidels by the Sunnis especially the Wahabi sect of Saudi Arabia, thought to be behind the Al Quaeda terror group. Tribalism was rife in Hussein's Iraq and Gaddafi's Libya, only held in check by the brutality of the regimes in charge. With the leaders deposed, old feuds have been reignited causing widespread unrest in these Countries and their neighbours. Talking of old feuds reminds one that the Crusades were instigated to deprive the tribes of territory they felt they owned, land they were determined to defend with force. So too after the 1948 Palestine deal to create modern day Israel. The tribal lands taken are still being fought over. It must be recognised, therefore, that the resurgence of the tribal in fighting has directly led to the modern day terrorism against the West. The Arab character does not do compromise, as negotiators with ISIL can confirm.
It must also be said that because of this tendency to fight, Islam, too, has always been promoted by force. It is not, therefore, a religion of peace. Mohammed, forced to leave Mecca because of his beliefs, fled to Medina to raise an army against his adversaries. Even after his defeat at Uhud, he maintained that God hadn't abandoned him and was only testing him. The Prophet then raised a bigger army before pressing his claim, quickly realising that the bigger the army he had the more God favoured him in battle.
It is my belief that the battle for peace will only be won when the major Abrahamic Churches finally abandon Yahweh, God and Allah before administering peace and goodwill to all men; comfort and compassion to those in need for all mankind has a spiritual side that often needs mending in the same way that medicine cures the physical body.

Wednesday, 28 October 2015

Iron & Steel. Osborne's test

When one thinks of strategic industries one instinctively thinks of iron and steel, the core of the Country's dramatic rise to the forefront of the world's leading Nations during the Victorian era. Other industries have fallen by the wayside, shipbuilding and coal easily come to mind but can the UK afford to lose the ability to make steel; not only the furnaces but the skills of the men and women driven out of their lifelong work.
I believe, for reasons of National Security, that both shipbuilding and coal ought to be maintained but steel is a special case and we only have to look at the Nuclear Power industry to see why. After the second World War, the UK were world leaders in the development of nuclear power but Scargill's miners treacherously persuaded the Labour Government of the time to run down our research at Harwell, Culcheth etc. Experts emigrated and skills were lost resulting in the situation now where the Country has to rely on French and Chinese know-how to build power stations. This short termism could result in a similar situation with steel, particularly if conflict compromises access to supplies.
Financial support for the industry might fall foul of EU rules and regulations but this will be yet another reason to abandon Europe and its flawed ideology. The ability to make iron and steel must be preserved at all costs and for Osborne to oversee its demise on financial grounds would also be an act of treachery.

Gay footballers

It is reported that two international, Premiership football players are to 'come out' as being gay. It is strange that in these days this should still be headline news but it was less so when I wrote my story, 'The Centre-Halves Tale', part of my novel, 'THE GEORGE AT BUSTINGTON'. The book is available as paperback or ebook here:

The music of Andre Rieu

I, and to judge by the numbers who attend his concerts, am not alone in enjoying the music of Andre Rieu. To see the joy and happiness on the faces of those attending bears witness to the magic of music. But this is not just any music, it is music tried and tested to appeal over the generations because it is tuneful. The shows do not include posturing, prancing 'pop' stars with their affected delivery, their sounds more akin to agony rather than joy, nor does this point to a narrow menu of genres which includes the best from opera, musicals, cinema and pop; tastefully performed by artists of the highest quality.
Music like this lifts the spirit and brings joy in a world that often only yields hardship. Research at Oxford University has shown that choral singing is effective in bringing people together, but they had only to witness a Rieu concert to know this.

Monday, 19 October 2015

Joubert plays God

Recent games in the Rugby Union World Cup have highlighted the demise of this once great game. In March 2010, I wrote a blog, here:
If anything, what happened yesterday between Scotland and Australia demonstrates that the problem has worsened. After eighty minutes of blood sweat and tears, the result was settled by the referee's divisive decision. The teams might just as well have tossed a coin and saved themselves the trouble.
It's not all the official's fault. In many situations there are any number of reasons to whistle resulting in referee's awarding alternate penalties to give the impression of balanced objectivity.
Here are a couple of suggestions.
Scrums are the biggest problem. The rules need overhauling.
Reduce the numbers taking part from eight to six in a three-two-one formation.
Scrap all offences arising from the scrum. Once the ball is put in, anything goes and having emerged is in play.
I believe that the scoring system needs to be adjusted to reflect a bigger reward for tries. It is worth the risk of defenders committing more offences to protect their line. Too many games are won with penalty kicks rather than tries.

Tries. 5 points
Conversions. 1 point
Dropped goals. 3 points
All penalties. 2 points

Thursday, 15 October 2015

Brain Stimulation Therapies

There is much interest in brain stimulation therapies, particularly its effectiveness against mental problems such as depression. The treatment involves targeting parts of the brain with either electrical or magnetic stimuli. On reading about the research into this field one is immediately hit with the notion that nobody really knows if and why it works. Nor does human knowledge admit, despite intense research, to knowing where memory resides.
As in so many aspects of science today, the problem here is the reluctance of the scientific community to accept views that cannot be empirically verified; they do not accept that what we see or sense, may not be all you get. Time for my theory of 'Negative Dimensions' to come to the rescue. The theory as described in my booklet: 'Spiritual man: An Introduction to Negative Dimensions', promotes the universe as a duality, with aspects of our sister cosmos manifest in our own. These properties can only be understood in terms of negative and 'complex' dimensions, the most obvious example being time. Simply put, if we call the 'present', the here and now moment as 'real' time, 't', then the past can be thought of as 'unreal' time, '-t' and the future, 'imaginary' time, 'it' where 'i' is the square root of minus one. This latter, introduced by Stephen Hawking in his book: 'A Brief History of Time'.
If I am right, then no trace of memory in the brain is due to the fact that scientists are trying to find something that cannot be sensed with modern day equipment. It is there but accessible by the brain using 'unreal' time and subsequently manifest in our power of recall. Electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain may be working on this unseen world, a world where neurons respond to hidden and mysterious processes involving negative dimensions.

Thursday, 1 October 2015

Quantum weirdness explained

Spiritual Man and Quantum Weirdness

In my book, ‘Spiritual Man: An Introduction to Negative Dimensions’, I try to explain one aspect of quantum weirdness, the paradox of conjugate electrons. I did this by supposing that particles, in this case, electrons, could be supposed to be a point object with two extra dimensions apart from the ‘real’ one. The additional dimensions I describe as the ‘unreal’ and the ‘imaginary’. By using these extra dimensions I showed that outcome of each experiment was predictable; that by observing one electron’s spin, the other would always be the opposite.
In my booklet, I show that by introducing these extra dimensions we can unlock the mysteries of the universe, its origin and properties, giving rise to explanations for amongst other things, human behaviour. I also showed that the universe could be accurately depicted as shown by the Dao symbol of Yin and Yang, the Taijitu.

This depiction shows the universe to be a duality as described in the world’s first book of cosmology, Genesis which states that in the beginning God created the heavens and earth. It also corresponds to Plato’s picture of a ‘Phenominal’ and ‘Noumenal’ world, the latter described by Emmanuel Kant as being ‘transcendental’.
The Taijitu clearly shows that some of each part of the universe is manifest in the other and it is this, I suggest, that gives rise to the mysteries of life. One such mystery, I submit, is that of ‘quantum weirdness’. Many famous and successful scientists have been disturbed by the implications of quantum theory, many happy to go along with it as long as experiments continue to show no deviation from its predictions. Nevertheless, many aspects leave scientists unhappy because this practice is a departure from the normal empirical demands that underpin scientific work. None more so than the premise that particles can be in two places at once, so let me begin there.

If we say that a photon (P) can be perceived as being a function of the ‘real’ photon (p), an ‘unreal’ photon (-p) and an ‘imaginary’ photon (ip) where ‘i’ is the square root of minus one then:  P = f (p, -p, ip) 
We can determine how we perceive P by the following ( trinitarian) equation, incidentally, used by Michio Kaku when introducing ‘hyperspace’ in his book of the same name:

P = ±√[p² + (-p)² + (ip) ²]

Solving this we arrive at:   P = ± p

In other words, by introducing these extra dimensions we have, not only the ‘real’ photon we can see and measure, but a second one that we cannot. Therefore, it is my contention that when experimenters see one photon there is always another, not always occupying the same space. We can use the same argument to demonstrate that the ‘two slit’ experiment will also show a diffraction or interference like pattern when experimenters believe they are firing single photons or electrons. In practice, they are not because each particle has an ‘unreal’ counterpart, suggesting that there is no need of a particle/wave duality.
Similarly, we might also explain some of the more obscure observations of the quantum era. For instance could it be that the mortality (M) of  Schrödinger’s cat can likewise be described in terms of ‘m’ (alive), ‘-m’ (dead) and imaginary, ‘im’.
By the same argument, adopted above, we can see that:  M = ± m
In other words, the cat can be either dead or alive.
In making these assertions I should say that in normal life, these extra dimensions cancel each other out and we are largely unaware of them. For this reason, science and scientists are unwilling to look at them for fear of being seen as ridiculous. I would therefore like to see some real scientists follow up these observations to see if they explain some of the enigmas of science today.

My theory explains that our dual universe emerges from the eternal and infinite ‘Pleroma’. This is the perfect nothingness that arises from the ‘zero’ balance of the ‘real’ and ‘imaginary’ terms introduced above (Please see my book for details).
Since my book was published I have considered that further to my brief incursion into quantum effects, there maybe more I can say. In particular, I now believe that the Pleroma now exists in every atom. Science today tells us that the space inside an atom is a vacuum and as far as tests are concerned, perhaps it is. But I now believe that it consists of the same material from which the universe itself came from. I believe this because Nature hates zero as much as it hates a vacuum. The taijitu teaches us that there is a part of our sister universe within our own; probably manifest in the presence of dark matter and dark energy but is there more?
What about subatomic particles? If each quark is in reality accompanied by an ‘unreal’ version how will this manifest itself? Will it explain better the fundamental forces of nature and consign string theory to the scrapheap or will it provide the impetus needed to find the ‘theory of everything’? 

Over to you, cosmologists, astrophysicists, particle physicists and other truth seekers.